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Tuesday, December 13

  1. msg Further Work message posted Further Work Bio needs development. Analyses of poetry need development and/or annotation. Videos need some sort…
    Further Work
    Bio needs development. Analyses of poetry need development and/or annotation. Videos need some sort of context and some of their content should be added to bio. Citations needed.
    1:42 pm
  2. msg Further Work message posted Further Work Flix citations (add Britannica to references, e.g.), Analysis of Riders needs development and some …
    Further Work
    Flix citations (add Britannica to references, e.g.), Analysis of Riders needs development and some context. Bio could use a bit more in terms of Synge's place w/in the Celtic Revival and 20th-c drama.
    12:54 pm
  3. page John Millington Synge edited ... to travel back and forth to the Aran Islands for a number of years. During these travels, Syn…
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    to travel back and forth to the Aran Islands for a number of years.
    During these travels, Synge was already living with the early effects of the lymphoma that ended his
    life (Brittanica).(Britannica). His observations
    inspired one of Synge's most famous plays, The Playboy of the Western World.The play, with its
    unsentimental treatment of Irishmen's love for boasting and their tendency to promote ruffians and
    ...
    Abbey Theatre (Brittanica).(Britannica).
    Notably, one of Synge's best works came as Riders to the Sea, a short, one act play written in 1904.
    Despite it'sits length, Riders
    true plight of the rural Irish (Poetry Foundation).
    As the lymphoma grew, Synge continued to write. He was able to draft, but not complete, his final play
    ...
    friends, W.B. Yeats and Lady Gregory, who performed the play as-is in Synge's memory (Poetry Foundation).
    In the years to follow the success of the play, many critics came to reason if the Deirdre of Sorrows had
    ...
    Synge had
    grown

    grown
    as an
    ...
    through hard-pressed
    observations.

    observations.
    This lifetime
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    the foremost
    English-language dramatists in the twentieth century.
    Chronology:
    ...
    This was truly one of Synge's best works as he introduces such a rich plot with such little writing. He was able to
    tell us a story that could be told for centuries in such short amount of time and still give somewhat of the same
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    reading a ShakespearianShakespearean tragedy. His
    source of inspiration made him create possibly his best work, The Playboy of the Western World.
    Below are links to e-texts of some of Synge's plays:
    (view changes)
    12:51 pm
  4. msg Further Work message posted Further Work Some visuals would help here along w/ a more comprehensive analysis that has less of a summary feel…
    Further Work
    Some visuals would help here along w/ a more comprehensive analysis that has less of a summary feel to it.
    12:17 pm
  5. msg Further Work message posted Further Work Citations and some visuals would enhance this page.
    Further Work
    Citations and some visuals would enhance this page.
    12:12 pm
  6. page The Peasant Poet edited ... Lines 5-12: God and religion are now introduced in an attempt to enhance and legitimize the id…
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    Lines 5-12: God and religion are now introduced in an attempt to enhance and legitimize the ideas and imagery that were expressed in the lines prior. Everything around him, the clouds and insects, are all created by God, and it is for that reason that Clare loves nature. One can also infer that the narrator or Clare himself was among "everything his eyes surveyed" which would mean that Clare too was "God Almighty made" and he too should be loved. Given this context, one might inquire about the poet's self-perception and feelings of acceptance.
    Lines 13-16: In the final four lines Clare presents four aspects that make up the bulk of his personality. The manner in which he does this is meant to radiate the first four lines regarding nature. Clare presents nature in its many differing forms just how he presents himself in varying forms. The intent of this is to show the reader that Clare, like nature, comes in many different forms, all of them derived from God, and therefore should be accepted and loved just the same.
    ...
    or his peerspeers' acceptance of
    ...
    to visit. ThisCitation?This perhaps was
    From the title, it is evident that this poem was written during the Romantic Era being that Romantic authors often wrote about subjects that outsiders, or peasants, can relate to. Interestingly enough, Clare represents both the audience and speaker as he himself was considered a peasant. Clare also equates nature to religion, saying that everything from clouds to insects are here because God created them. It is in this exclamation that Clare is attempting to connect with this audience of Romanticism. Talking about nature and relating nature to God are both traits of Romantic literature. Clare even often mores than a lot of romantic poets utilizes his senses in describing the environment around him. Also most of his poem are in a way a homage to God, his creator, and the creator of everything he sees and feels.
    (view changes)
    12:11 pm

Monday, December 12

  1. page Mary Shelley edited ... In 1816, the couple famously spent a summer with Lord Byron, John William Polidori, and Jane C…
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    In 1816, the couple famously spent a summer with Lord Byron, John William Polidori, and Jane Clairmont near Geneva, Switzerland. This is where Mary conceived the idea for her novel Frankenstein after the group read a book of ghost stories on a rainy day and Lord Byron suggested that they all write their own horror stories.
    Later on in the year of 1816, Mary's half - sister Fanny committed suicide and so did Percy's wife a short time later. Mary and Percy got married in December of 1816, and she published a travelogue of their escape to Europe titled History of a Six Weeks' Tour (1817).
    ...
    he penned it'sits introduction, but none the lessnonetheless it turned
    At the age of 24, Mary Shelley became a widow after Percy passed away. During this time she wrote several more novels including, Valperga and The Last Man. She also spent a lot of her time promoting Percy's poetry and making sure he would be remembered in literary history.
    Sadly, Mary Shelley died of brain cancer on February 1, 1851, at the age of 53. Yet roughly a century after her passing, on her novels, Mathilde, was finally released in the 1950's. However, Mary Shelley today is still mostly known for her classic tale of Frankenstein.
    (view changes)
    3:39 pm
  2. msg Further Work message posted Further Work This is a good start. Continue tracing the critical reception of the novel up through the present. …
    Further Work
    This is a good start. Continue tracing the critical reception of the novel up through the present. Talk about other works the novel may have influenced.
    3:37 pm
  3. msg Future work message posted Future work Tighten the organization, expand the intro, and fix citations throughout.
    Future work
    Tighten the organization, expand the intro, and fix citations throughout.
    3:31 pm
  4. page Social and Family Life in the Late17th & Early 18th Centuries edited Introduction ... scene. This wiki page explores the ... was unimportant. Family Life …

    Introduction
    ...
    scene. This wikipage explores the
    ...
    was unimportant.
    Family Life
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    seldom married off into lower
    Role of Women and Men
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    had very littlefew rights and
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    of the patriarchy.patriarchy.SOURCE? Housework was
    {http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ZGtp0oRmQJU/T6OrnyoYTsI/AAAAAAAAJnE/T2q2RuPrJRg/s1600/1.JPG} 18th Century Wedding Ceremony
    Marriage
    Due to the the importance of land, daughters posed a large problem for landowning families. Other than widows, not many women owned land, and many daughters certainly did not receive any--so they did not carry an estate with them upon marriage. Also, it was important for families to maintain social status, which meant a daughter was never married to someone of lower standing. Mothers and fathers spent much time searching for the the best possible spouse for their child, in order to benefit the family. As a result, families typically placed a dowry on their daughter, which consisted of a large sum of money. These marriage negotiations were some of the most demanding strains on a mother and father due to a family's heritage and legacy being at stake. Then came along another problem: The idea of individualism, reason, and romantic sensibility began growing rapidly in the early part of the century leading to daughters wanting to choose their own husbands. For poor families, not nearly as much was at stake when marrying, thus relieving pressure. It was impossible to transfer poverty to one another or to lose any kind of societal status as a result of a marriage, so men and women were free to choose who they wanted.
    Family Life After Marriage
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    17th century. ThisSOURCE?This gradually decreased
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    century, as LEHMBERG AND Heyck notesnote in his book series The People
    Divorce and Separation
    Divorce was carried out through Parliament and was a lengthy and extremely expensive process reserved mainly for the bourgeoisie. Between 1700 and 1749, only 13 cases of divorce were reported. A woman could not independently file for divorce and a husband's unfaithfulness was not grounds for one either. These separations could be made in private agreement or in public, ecclesiastical court.
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    The life of an average family in late 17th century England was simple, let laborious. Many lived in one or two room houses that were often crowded with large families, as well as lodgers that shared their living space. Women typically gave birth to eight to ten children; however, due to high mortality rates, only raised five or six children. The children of average or poor families began working very early on in life, sometimes even as early as age seven. They worked mostly on farms as shepherds, cowherds, or apprentices and often left home to do so. Daughters of these families remained home, often aiding the matriarch of the household until they found a husband and started a family of their own. The oldest son of each family would stay as home as well, in order to inherit the farm. The concept of inheritance was often a source of tension for many families. The average and poor families of the late 17th century England did not yet have the luxury of piped water, which created a rarity in bathing. Because of the unhygienic lifestyle, lice and vermin were very common with these families.
    Upper Class
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    run it” (Lambert).(Lambert p. #?).
    {https://iamachild.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/portrait-of-a-family-probably-that-of-richard-streatfeild.jpg?w=500&h=423} 17th Century Family Portrait
    Similarities Between Families in Both Classes
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    Labor
    In agricultural families, men, for the most part, took care of the majority of the household income. Households were first and foremost a patriarch; they controlled every aspect of the house. Women were to act as subordinates. Men did the most tiring labor in the field such as clearing, plowing, sowing seed, harvesting, and threshing. This was also with the help of their sons and hired laborers. Women were helped by their daughters or servants in everything from knitting; to cleaning; to tending to the animals; to teaching the children. They were to take care of most of the internal tending in the household as it was commonly seen as women's chores.
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    jail keepers. Source??
    Social Life
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    by everybody.
    Social Classes
    The idea of a status hierarchy or "social class" was a distinguishing key feature in the 18th Century. This hierarchy determined everything about society and etched their fate eternally in stone. Among the differences in these classes were the attitudes that each one exhibited. The poor could spend their entire life attempting to move up the social ladder and attain some form of wealth and "class," but these men and women were ridiculed and pitied for their lack of social graces. No matter the pigeonholes that were set on those of poorer status, there was still a pecking order and sense of loyalty to social superiors. The one way to move up in this time period was to own land. Landowners held power and influence. This made it difficult to move up the social ranks, seeing as how buying land was considered a luxury even in those days.
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    Sports
    {https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-hHCU5XMr-tw/UivAqR-vUiI/AAAAAAABih0/c8HqqhllVGw/s1600/b+Pieter+Angillis+(Flemish,+1685-1734)+Figures+on+a+Bowling+Ground.jpg} 18th Century Lawn Bowling
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    an outdoors type of people when
    {https://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/special/images/minor/burden/beggars_opera.jpg} The Beggar's Opera, Written by John Gay.Plays
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    home. The countriescountry's greatest play
    Other Entertainment
    Art shows were another source of pleasure for various people of all ages. Wax figures, sculptures, and paintings were all popular. Public fairs were immensely popular, ranging anywhere from two to six weeks. Fireworks, music, plays, animal fights, eating competitions, and gambling could all be found at various fairs. Assemblies and balls offered young people an opportunity for courtship. The price of admission sorted out the very poor and distinguished the rest by their respective social class. Women loved the aspect of dancing and gossiping about the men in attendance and the mothers enjoyed the matchmaking idea of it all. Clubs and societies offered mostly men a place to meet others with common interests. Coffeehouses saw some of the greatest thinkers of the 18th century gather and discuss everything from sports to philosophy. Gentleman's club acted as more exclusive, all male coffeehouse. The Freemasons were founded in 1717 and included most of the male royals by the end of the century. Gambling and card games became other large sources of entertainment for the public. It was very common to bet on various sporting events where huge sums of money were sometimes gambled away in one sitting. The government did not want to penalize its own members who gambled so it made life difficult on working class game house owners. Whether or not they were gambled on, games were played by everyone. The most notable of them being backgammon, chess, checkers, and cribbage. Some of the more violent forms of entertainment came in the form of animal torture and fighting where many gathered around to see the carnage that ensued. A popular spectacle was "baiting" where tying up animals and sending dogs after it was commonplace. Fighting between humans were considered all in good fun including the emergence of boxing and wrestling. Alcohol also became popular during this time with the liquor of choice being gin. It was cheap and easy to make, and you did not need a license to sell it, making it a hot commodity during this time. The downside to bottom shelf liquor was the affects it had on your health. Many people suffered greatly from the overabundance of gin, but for many poor people it had become almost a comfort to them. People of upper class generally never bothered with things like homemade gin, due to the fact that they could afford better quality liquor.
    (view changes)
    3:29 pm

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