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Tuesday, July 11

  1. msg Wiki website message posted Wiki website Wiki is a website that allow you and other users to edit its content and structure
    Wiki website
    Wiki is a website that allow you and other users to edit its content and structure
    12:25 pm

Friday, June 30

  1. msg Interest in the Painting Accident in a Mine message posted Interest in the Painting Accident in a Mine Hello, I have an interest in Lawrence's paintings. I have created a simple Facebook Page devoted to…
    Interest in the Painting Accident in a Mine
    Hello, I have an interest in Lawrence's paintings. I have created a simple Facebook Page devoted to his paintings. I present them and give a little commentary on them. The painting that you have presented in your essay called Accident in a Mine interests me because the colours are much more vivid and realistic than the copies that I have. I have photocopied the painting from several different books, from the Mandrake Press edition, Mervyn Levy's book and Keith Sagar's. All the reproductions in those books don't have the rich colour that your image has. The colours are so poor that the reproductions are almost worthless, in my opinion. It is a painting that the public have not had the chance to experienced because of the woeful reproductions. Why the painting fails so drastically from poor reproduction is that the picture is mostly darkness. It is a scene in a mine. The darkness in the poor reproductions doesn't look like darkness at all. And the firelight from the lamps the minors are holding doesn't look like firelight at all. The naked bodies are not lit up like in your image but are pale.
    I'm sorry to say, but I have copied your image to show to people what the original would look like. Unfortunately your image has such low resolution that I don't use it as a main presentation. I only use it as a reference note.
    What I wonder is, where or how did you get your image? And if you have a high resolution image that you would share?

    Yours sincerely,
    Ian Bull
    2:54 am

Monday, May 22

  1. page William Hazlitt edited ... By 1811, Hazlitt found himself extremely poor. He had accomplished numerous literary works, bu…
    ...
    By 1811, Hazlitt found himself extremely poor. He had accomplished numerous literary works, but none of them had become overwhelmingly successful. His next plan was to give philosophy lectures for a class in London. He also worked for the Morning Chronicle to make some more money. Here, he wound up becoming an established “critic, journalist and essayist” (“William Hazlitt”), whose, “dramatic criticism appeared as A View of the English Stage in 1818” (“William Hazlitt”). He continued to pursue lecturing and delivered a variety of brilliant lectures such as On the English Poets, published 1818, and On the English Comic Writers, published 1819. These lectures secured Hazlitt as a reputable lecturer. After publishing Lectures on the Dramatic Literature of the Age of Elizabeth in 1819, he committed to writing essays for journals throughout London, including London Magazine.
    Hazlitt and his wife were divorced in 1822, and following this, Hazlitt went through a nasty affair with the daughter of his landlord. As difficult a time that this was for Hazlitt, critics argue that this was the time period that birthed some of his best writing. Both Table Talk (1821) and The Plain Speaker (1826) were composed of intriguing and thoughtful essays. In 1824, he published Sketches of the Principal Picture Galleries in England, which is famous for its piece about the Dulwich gallery in London.
    ...
    in 1830. He passed away with severe gastrointestinal pain and discomfort, which doctors now speculate could have been caused by extreme IBM or cancer of the stomach.
    II. The Spirit of the Age
    {hazlitt 2.jpg}
    (view changes)
    1:28 pm
  2. page William Hazlitt edited ... When Hazlitt discusses “Mr. Wordsworth”, also known as the poet, William Wordsworth, he begins…
    ...
    When Hazlitt discusses “Mr. Wordsworth”, also known as the poet, William Wordsworth, he begins with his literary criticism of his work. Wordsworth wrote largely about the beauty and immortality of nature in the late 1800s to the early 1900s. His heavy dabble in romanticism and empirical observations of nature differed greatly from Hazlitt, who led a life of solitude, which was distinctly reflected in his work. Hazlitt comments that Wordsworth’s style of writing is to, “[take] a subject or a story merely as pegs or loops to hang thought and feeling on” (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). This indicates that Hazlitt acknowledges the emotion toward and connection with nature, but compares his delivery to useful but bland everyday items. He continues his criticism of Wordsworth’s work by saying that, “No storm no shipwreck startles us by its horrors; but the rainbow lifts its head in the cloud, and the breeze sighs through the withered fern. No sad vicissitude of fate, no overwhelming catastrophe in nature deforms his page: but the dew-drop glitters on the bending flower, the tear collects in the glistening eye” (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). Hazlitt’s comments imply that Wordsworth’s writing is not overwhelmingly effective, but pleasant. Wordsworth portrays emotion and the beauty of nature without divulging deep in thought or philosophy, which is more Hazlitt’s style.
    Further on, Hazlitt seems to respects Wordsworth’s work, no matter how different from his own. He comments that, “The fashionable may ridicule [Wordsworth’s works]: but the author has created himself an interest in the heart of the retired and lonely student of nature, which can never die” (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). A loner himself, Hazlitt recognizes the pleasant isolation Wordsworth feels as a “student of nature”. To truly commit yourself to loneliness, you must dedicate your heart to the lifestyle. Hazlitt recognizes that Wordsworth does this, and has an immortal bond with nature and his surroundings. Hazlitt continues to discuss the way Wordsworth, “has described all these objects [of nature] in a way and with an intensity of feeling that no one else had done before him, and has given a new view or aspect of nature. He is in this sense the most original poet now living, and the one whose writings could the least be spared: for they have no substitute elsewhere." (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). Hazlitt admires the uniqueness of Wordsworth’s connection to nature. His literature may not move his audience to sadness or despair, but it will portray nature in an original, beautiful and thoughtful way. Overall, Hazlitt respects the styles of Wordsworth, although different from his own. His commentary on “Mr. Wordsworth” is one of the more positive and admirable pieces in Spirit of the Age.
    References
    William Hazlitt, British Writer, Encyclopedia Britannica (https://www.britannica.com/biography/William-Hazlitt)
    William Hazlitt's Spirit of the Age, Essays: Picked by Blupete (http://www.blupete.com/Literature/Essays/TableHazIII.htm)
    (view changes)
    1:24 pm
  3. page William Hazlitt edited William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Age ... Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt {hazlitt 3.jpg} Table o…
    William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Age
    ...
    Hazlitt, 1830
    {hazlitt
    {hazlitt 3.jpg}
    Table on Contents
    I. Background
    (view changes)
    1:23 pm
  4. page William Hazlitt edited William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Age ... Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt {hazlitt 3.jpg} Ta…

    William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Age
    ...
    Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt
    {hazlitt
    3.jpg}
    Table on Contents
    I. Background
    ...
    While writing and publishing many more works, he married a woman named Bridgwater. The couple traveled abroad exploring Europe and recording their experience in Notes of a Journey in France and Italy, published in 1826. They briefly settled in France where Hazlitt developed some of his most influential work The Spirit of the Age in 1825. Hazlitt and Bridgwater divorced after three years later due to family controversy. Hazlitt’s son resented his second wife, and Hazlitt had no greater love than for his son. So the two separated and divorced, but Hazlitt remained in France. There, he developed and published Life of Napoleon, 4 vol. from 1828 to 1830. His final book was Conversations of James Northcote, which depicted his long friendship with said painter. Hazlitt published it year that he died in 1830. He passed away with severe gastrointestinal pain and discomfort, which doctors now speculate could have been caused by extreme IBM or cancer of the stomach.
    II. The Spirit of the Age
    {hazlitt 2.jpg}
    a. Introduction
    {hazlitt 2.jpg} s.hal;kjsd
    b. Purpose
    Born under the political regime of France, William Hazlitt developed a burning passion for freedom at an early age. His radical ideas were only fueled at school, where he was introduced to politics and art. Due to the unfortunate circumstance of moving around frequently in his life, Hazlitt had no conceptions of social interaction, and thus, struggled to maintain relationships with fellow contemporaries. "The Spirit of the Age" came towards the end of Hazlitt’s life, just years before his death. In it, he creates portraits of all the men he once had acquaintances with, critiquing their works, and assessing their progression in literacy development.
    (view changes)
    1:21 pm
  5. page William Hazlitt edited William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Age {hazlitt 1.jpg} William Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt 3.jpg} …

    William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Age
    {hazlitt 1.jpg} William Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt 3.jpg}
    (view changes)
    1:17 pm
  6. page William Hazlitt edited ... of the Ages Age {hazlitt 1.jpg} William Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt 3.jpg} Table on Content…
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    of the AgesAge
    {hazlitt 1.jpg} William Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt 3.jpg}
    Table on Contents
    (view changes)
    1:14 pm
  7. page William Hazlitt edited William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Ages ... Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt 2.jpg} s.hal;kjsd {hazlit…
    William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Ages
    ...
    Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt 2.jpg} s.hal;kjsd {hazlitt 3.jpg}
    Table on Contents
    I. Background
    ...
    II. The Spirit of the Age
    a. Introduction
    {hazlitt 2.jpg} s.hal;kjsd
    b. Purpose
    Born under the political regime of France, William Hazlitt developed a burning passion for freedom at an early age. His radical ideas were only fueled at school, where he was introduced to politics and art. Due to the unfortunate circumstance of moving around frequently in his life, Hazlitt had no conceptions of social interaction, and thus, struggled to maintain relationships with fellow contemporaries. "The Spirit of the Age" came towards the end of Hazlitt’s life, just years before his death. In it, he creates portraits of all the men he once had acquaintances with, critiquing their works, and assessing their progression in literacy development.
    (view changes)
    1:09 pm
  8. page William Hazlitt edited William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Ages This page is intended to inform students participating in…
    William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Ages
    This page is intended to inform students participating in the British Literature Wiki about effective web page design. Besides having informative, well-researched material, the wiki pages should be aesthetically appealing and able to convey meaning through their appearance as well as their words. This page will attempt to assist you in accomplishing this balance. The remainder of this page will demonstrate through its design in hopes to not only tell, but show. There are four subheadings in this page: Fonts, Font Styles, Page Layout and Design, and Appropriate Documentation. And under each subheading you will find a format suggestions as well as why each respective suggestion is effective.
    {hazlitt 1.jpg} William Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt 2.jpg} s.hal;kjsd {hazlitt 3.jpg}
    Table on Contents
    ...
    When Hazlitt discusses “Mr. Wordsworth”, also known as the poet, William Wordsworth, he begins with his literary criticism of his work. Wordsworth wrote largely about the beauty and immortality of nature in the late 1800s to the early 1900s. His heavy dabble in romanticism and empirical observations of nature differed greatly from Hazlitt, who led a life of solitude, which was distinctly reflected in his work. Hazlitt comments that Wordsworth’s style of writing is to, “[take] a subject or a story merely as pegs or loops to hang thought and feeling on” (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). This indicates that Hazlitt acknowledges the emotion toward and connection with nature, but compares his delivery to useful but bland everyday items. He continues his criticism of Wordsworth’s work by saying that, “No storm no shipwreck startles us by its horrors; but the rainbow lifts its head in the cloud, and the breeze sighs through the withered fern. No sad vicissitude of fate, no overwhelming catastrophe in nature deforms his page: but the dew-drop glitters on the bending flower, the tear collects in the glistening eye” (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). Hazlitt’s comments imply that Wordsworth’s writing is not overwhelmingly effective, but pleasant. Wordsworth portrays emotion and the beauty of nature without divulging deep in thought or philosophy, which is more Hazlitt’s style.
    Further on, Hazlitt seems to respects Wordsworth’s work, no matter how different from his own. He comments that, “The fashionable may ridicule [Wordsworth’s works]: but the author has created himself an interest in the heart of the retired and lonely student of nature, which can never die” (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). A loner himself, Hazlitt recognizes the pleasant isolation Wordsworth feels as a “student of nature”. To truly commit yourself to loneliness, you must dedicate your heart to the lifestyle. Hazlitt recognizes that Wordsworth does this, and has an immortal bond with nature and his surroundings. Hazlitt continues to discuss the way Wordsworth, “has described all these objects [of nature] in a way and with an intensity of feeling that no one else had done before him, and has given a new view or aspect of nature. He is in this sense the most original poet now living, and the one whose writings could the least be spared: for they have no substitute elsewhere." (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). Hazlitt admires the uniqueness of Wordsworth’s connection to nature. His literature may not move his audience to sadness or despair, but it will portray nature in an original, beautiful and thoughtful way. Overall, Hazlitt respects the styles of Wordsworth, although different from his own. His commentary on “Mr. Wordsworth” is one of the more positive and admirable pieces in Spirit of the Age.
    References
    A book:
    Horton, Sarah and Patrick J. Lynch. Web Style Guide: Basic Principles for Creating Websites. 3rd Ed.
    A journal article:

    William Hazlitt, British Writer, Encyclopedia Britannica (https://www.britannica.com/biography/William-Hazlitt)
    A Web page:
    William Hazlitt's Spirit of the Age, Essays: Picked by Blupete (http://www.blupete.com/Literature/Essays/TableHazIII.htm)
    Portrait of Sam Coleridge
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f2/Samuel_Taylor_Coleridge_by_Washington_Allston_retouched.jpg/220px-Samuel_Taylor_Coleridge_by_Washington_Allston_retouched.jpg
    Portrait of Lord Byron;
    (view changes)
    1:06 pm

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