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  1. page William Hazlitt edited ... By 1811, Hazlitt found himself extremely poor. He had accomplished numerous literary works, bu…
    ...
    By 1811, Hazlitt found himself extremely poor. He had accomplished numerous literary works, but none of them had become overwhelmingly successful. His next plan was to give philosophy lectures for a class in London. He also worked for the Morning Chronicle to make some more money. Here, he wound up becoming an established “critic, journalist and essayist” (“William Hazlitt”), whose, “dramatic criticism appeared as A View of the English Stage in 1818” (“William Hazlitt”). He continued to pursue lecturing and delivered a variety of brilliant lectures such as On the English Poets, published 1818, and On the English Comic Writers, published 1819. These lectures secured Hazlitt as a reputable lecturer. After publishing Lectures on the Dramatic Literature of the Age of Elizabeth in 1819, he committed to writing essays for journals throughout London, including London Magazine.
    Hazlitt and his wife were divorced in 1822, and following this, Hazlitt went through a nasty affair with the daughter of his landlord. As difficult a time that this was for Hazlitt, critics argue that this was the time period that birthed some of his best writing. Both Table Talk (1821) and The Plain Speaker (1826) were composed of intriguing and thoughtful essays. In 1824, he published Sketches of the Principal Picture Galleries in England, which is famous for its piece about the Dulwich gallery in London.
    ...
    in 1830. He passed away with severe gastrointestinal pain and discomfort, which doctors now speculate could have been caused by extreme IBM or cancer of the stomach.
    II. The Spirit of the Age
    {hazlitt 2.jpg}
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    1:28 pm
  2. page William Hazlitt edited ... When Hazlitt discusses “Mr. Wordsworth”, also known as the poet, William Wordsworth, he begins…
    ...
    When Hazlitt discusses “Mr. Wordsworth”, also known as the poet, William Wordsworth, he begins with his literary criticism of his work. Wordsworth wrote largely about the beauty and immortality of nature in the late 1800s to the early 1900s. His heavy dabble in romanticism and empirical observations of nature differed greatly from Hazlitt, who led a life of solitude, which was distinctly reflected in his work. Hazlitt comments that Wordsworth’s style of writing is to, “[take] a subject or a story merely as pegs or loops to hang thought and feeling on” (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). This indicates that Hazlitt acknowledges the emotion toward and connection with nature, but compares his delivery to useful but bland everyday items. He continues his criticism of Wordsworth’s work by saying that, “No storm no shipwreck startles us by its horrors; but the rainbow lifts its head in the cloud, and the breeze sighs through the withered fern. No sad vicissitude of fate, no overwhelming catastrophe in nature deforms his page: but the dew-drop glitters on the bending flower, the tear collects in the glistening eye” (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). Hazlitt’s comments imply that Wordsworth’s writing is not overwhelmingly effective, but pleasant. Wordsworth portrays emotion and the beauty of nature without divulging deep in thought or philosophy, which is more Hazlitt’s style.
    Further on, Hazlitt seems to respects Wordsworth’s work, no matter how different from his own. He comments that, “The fashionable may ridicule [Wordsworth’s works]: but the author has created himself an interest in the heart of the retired and lonely student of nature, which can never die” (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). A loner himself, Hazlitt recognizes the pleasant isolation Wordsworth feels as a “student of nature”. To truly commit yourself to loneliness, you must dedicate your heart to the lifestyle. Hazlitt recognizes that Wordsworth does this, and has an immortal bond with nature and his surroundings. Hazlitt continues to discuss the way Wordsworth, “has described all these objects [of nature] in a way and with an intensity of feeling that no one else had done before him, and has given a new view or aspect of nature. He is in this sense the most original poet now living, and the one whose writings could the least be spared: for they have no substitute elsewhere." (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). Hazlitt admires the uniqueness of Wordsworth’s connection to nature. His literature may not move his audience to sadness or despair, but it will portray nature in an original, beautiful and thoughtful way. Overall, Hazlitt respects the styles of Wordsworth, although different from his own. His commentary on “Mr. Wordsworth” is one of the more positive and admirable pieces in Spirit of the Age.
    References
    William Hazlitt, British Writer, Encyclopedia Britannica (https://www.britannica.com/biography/William-Hazlitt)
    William Hazlitt's Spirit of the Age, Essays: Picked by Blupete (http://www.blupete.com/Literature/Essays/TableHazIII.htm)
    (view changes)
    1:24 pm
  3. page William Hazlitt edited William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Age ... Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt {hazlitt 3.jpg} Table o…
    William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Age
    ...
    Hazlitt, 1830
    {hazlitt
    {hazlitt 3.jpg}
    Table on Contents
    I. Background
    (view changes)
    1:23 pm
  4. page William Hazlitt edited William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Age ... Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt {hazlitt 3.jpg} Ta…

    William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Age
    ...
    Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt
    {hazlitt
    3.jpg}
    Table on Contents
    I. Background
    ...
    While writing and publishing many more works, he married a woman named Bridgwater. The couple traveled abroad exploring Europe and recording their experience in Notes of a Journey in France and Italy, published in 1826. They briefly settled in France where Hazlitt developed some of his most influential work The Spirit of the Age in 1825. Hazlitt and Bridgwater divorced after three years later due to family controversy. Hazlitt’s son resented his second wife, and Hazlitt had no greater love than for his son. So the two separated and divorced, but Hazlitt remained in France. There, he developed and published Life of Napoleon, 4 vol. from 1828 to 1830. His final book was Conversations of James Northcote, which depicted his long friendship with said painter. Hazlitt published it year that he died in 1830. He passed away with severe gastrointestinal pain and discomfort, which doctors now speculate could have been caused by extreme IBM or cancer of the stomach.
    II. The Spirit of the Age
    {hazlitt 2.jpg}
    a. Introduction
    {hazlitt 2.jpg} s.hal;kjsd
    b. Purpose
    Born under the political regime of France, William Hazlitt developed a burning passion for freedom at an early age. His radical ideas were only fueled at school, where he was introduced to politics and art. Due to the unfortunate circumstance of moving around frequently in his life, Hazlitt had no conceptions of social interaction, and thus, struggled to maintain relationships with fellow contemporaries. "The Spirit of the Age" came towards the end of Hazlitt’s life, just years before his death. In it, he creates portraits of all the men he once had acquaintances with, critiquing their works, and assessing their progression in literacy development.
    (view changes)
    1:21 pm
  5. page William Hazlitt edited William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Age {hazlitt 1.jpg} William Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt 3.jpg} …

    William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Age
    {hazlitt 1.jpg} William Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt 3.jpg}
    (view changes)
    1:17 pm
  6. page William Hazlitt edited ... of the Ages Age {hazlitt 1.jpg} William Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt 3.jpg} Table on Content…
    ...
    of the AgesAge
    {hazlitt 1.jpg} William Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt 3.jpg}
    Table on Contents
    (view changes)
    1:14 pm
  7. page William Hazlitt edited William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Ages ... Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt 2.jpg} s.hal;kjsd {hazlit…
    William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Ages
    ...
    Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt 2.jpg} s.hal;kjsd {hazlitt 3.jpg}
    Table on Contents
    I. Background
    ...
    II. The Spirit of the Age
    a. Introduction
    {hazlitt 2.jpg} s.hal;kjsd
    b. Purpose
    Born under the political regime of France, William Hazlitt developed a burning passion for freedom at an early age. His radical ideas were only fueled at school, where he was introduced to politics and art. Due to the unfortunate circumstance of moving around frequently in his life, Hazlitt had no conceptions of social interaction, and thus, struggled to maintain relationships with fellow contemporaries. "The Spirit of the Age" came towards the end of Hazlitt’s life, just years before his death. In it, he creates portraits of all the men he once had acquaintances with, critiquing their works, and assessing their progression in literacy development.
    (view changes)
    1:09 pm
  8. page William Hazlitt edited William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Ages This page is intended to inform students participating in…
    William Hazlitt; The Spirit of the Ages
    This page is intended to inform students participating in the British Literature Wiki about effective web page design. Besides having informative, well-researched material, the wiki pages should be aesthetically appealing and able to convey meaning through their appearance as well as their words. This page will attempt to assist you in accomplishing this balance. The remainder of this page will demonstrate through its design in hopes to not only tell, but show. There are four subheadings in this page: Fonts, Font Styles, Page Layout and Design, and Appropriate Documentation. And under each subheading you will find a format suggestions as well as why each respective suggestion is effective.
    {hazlitt 1.jpg} William Hazlitt, 1830 {hazlitt 2.jpg} s.hal;kjsd {hazlitt 3.jpg}
    Table on Contents
    ...
    When Hazlitt discusses “Mr. Wordsworth”, also known as the poet, William Wordsworth, he begins with his literary criticism of his work. Wordsworth wrote largely about the beauty and immortality of nature in the late 1800s to the early 1900s. His heavy dabble in romanticism and empirical observations of nature differed greatly from Hazlitt, who led a life of solitude, which was distinctly reflected in his work. Hazlitt comments that Wordsworth’s style of writing is to, “[take] a subject or a story merely as pegs or loops to hang thought and feeling on” (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). This indicates that Hazlitt acknowledges the emotion toward and connection with nature, but compares his delivery to useful but bland everyday items. He continues his criticism of Wordsworth’s work by saying that, “No storm no shipwreck startles us by its horrors; but the rainbow lifts its head in the cloud, and the breeze sighs through the withered fern. No sad vicissitude of fate, no overwhelming catastrophe in nature deforms his page: but the dew-drop glitters on the bending flower, the tear collects in the glistening eye” (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). Hazlitt’s comments imply that Wordsworth’s writing is not overwhelmingly effective, but pleasant. Wordsworth portrays emotion and the beauty of nature without divulging deep in thought or philosophy, which is more Hazlitt’s style.
    Further on, Hazlitt seems to respects Wordsworth’s work, no matter how different from his own. He comments that, “The fashionable may ridicule [Wordsworth’s works]: but the author has created himself an interest in the heart of the retired and lonely student of nature, which can never die” (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). A loner himself, Hazlitt recognizes the pleasant isolation Wordsworth feels as a “student of nature”. To truly commit yourself to loneliness, you must dedicate your heart to the lifestyle. Hazlitt recognizes that Wordsworth does this, and has an immortal bond with nature and his surroundings. Hazlitt continues to discuss the way Wordsworth, “has described all these objects [of nature] in a way and with an intensity of feeling that no one else had done before him, and has given a new view or aspect of nature. He is in this sense the most original poet now living, and the one whose writings could the least be spared: for they have no substitute elsewhere." (William Hazlitt’s Spirit of the Age). Hazlitt admires the uniqueness of Wordsworth’s connection to nature. His literature may not move his audience to sadness or despair, but it will portray nature in an original, beautiful and thoughtful way. Overall, Hazlitt respects the styles of Wordsworth, although different from his own. His commentary on “Mr. Wordsworth” is one of the more positive and admirable pieces in Spirit of the Age.
    References
    A book:
    Horton, Sarah and Patrick J. Lynch. Web Style Guide: Basic Principles for Creating Websites. 3rd Ed.
    A journal article:

    William Hazlitt, British Writer, Encyclopedia Britannica (https://www.britannica.com/biography/William-Hazlitt)
    A Web page:
    William Hazlitt's Spirit of the Age, Essays: Picked by Blupete (http://www.blupete.com/Literature/Essays/TableHazIII.htm)
    Portrait of Sam Coleridge
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f2/Samuel_Taylor_Coleridge_by_Washington_Allston_retouched.jpg/220px-Samuel_Taylor_Coleridge_by_Washington_Allston_retouched.jpg
    Portrait of Lord Byron;
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    1:06 pm
  9. page John Clare edited {490px-John_Clare.jpg} John Clare Who was John Clare? ... such as the novel his collection o…
    {490px-John_Clare.jpg} John Clare
    Who was John Clare?
    ...
    such as the novelhis collection of poems, The Rural Mouse, the poem I Am, and The Nightingales Nest.Muse.
    Today, Clare is known as one of the major 19th century poets.
    Early Life and Early Career
    ...
    in his fathersfather's footsteps and
    ...
    family was loosing moneylosing money, and he
    ...
    literary field. FansReaders noticed the
    Midlife
    ...
    health began declining,declining; this amount
    Later Life and Death
    ...
    such as I Am."I Am."
    Clare passed away on May 20th, 1864 at the age of 71. He was buried at his home in St. Botolph’s churchyard. To this day, children at the John Clare School, Helpston’s main school, hold a parade for this celebrated poet every year. Although the though of the nickname “The Peasant Poet” seems derogatory, Clare is appreciated by the middle and low class still to this day, as his ability to appeal to all walks of life is one that many can follow. This author proved that a lack of formal education does not have to limit one to a great career.
    Poetry-ClarePoetry-
    Clare
    found a
    Poems:
    I Am!
    I am—yet what I am none cares or knows;
    ...
    a memory lost:Ilost:
    I
    am the
    ...
    of my woes—Theywoes—
    They
    rise and
    ...
    in oblivious host,Likehost,
    Like
    shadows in
    ...
    frenzied stifled throesAndthroes
    And
    yet I
    ...
    scorn and noise,Intonoise,
    Into
    the living
    ...
    of waking dreams,Wheredreams,
    Where
    there is
    ...
    life or joys,Butjoys,
    But
    the vast
    ...
    my life’s esteems;Evenesteems;
    Even
    the dearest
    ...
    loved the bestArebest
    Are
    strange—nay, rather,
    ...
    hath never trodAtrod
    A
    place where
    ...
    smiled or weptTherewept
    There
    to abide
    ...
    my Creator, God,AndGod,
    And
    sleep as
    ...
    childhood sweetly slept,Untroublingslept,
    Untroubling
    and untroubled where I lieThelie
    The
    grass below—above
    Form and Meter: I Am is one of Clare's most famous poems known today. It is is written in iambic pentameter with three stanzas with six lines in each. The rhyme scheme in the first stanza is different than the last two. The first stanza has a rhyme scheme of ABABAB. The second and third stanza have a rhyme scheme of ABABCC. The way this poem is set up in form goes along with what the words say. The poem starts with a melancholy tone, but in the last stanza he seems to find a little more peace with the idea of death, which goes along with the change of rhyme scheme.
    First Stanza: Lines 1-2 begin with "I am-yet what I am none cares of knows; my friends forsake me like a memory lost;" The speaker seems to be telling the reader that he exists, even though his friends do not care or notice him anymore. Clare uses alliteration in line two by repeating the Fs in "friends" and "forsake." He also repeats the letter M in "me" and "memory."
    ...
    As the old woodland’s legacy of song.
    The poem “The Nightingales Nest” digs deeps into intricate imagery and wording that is truly beautiful. During this poem, John Clare does an excellent job connecting the reader with nature, not just describing it. John Clare brings you along in the poem, he doesn’t just tell you the story. The lines, “Laughing and creeping through the mossy rails- here have I hunted like a very boy, Creeping on hands and knees through matted thorns. To find her nest and see her feed her young.” make the reality of nature feel tangible. Another example of this explicit wording that makes the nature being described seem so real is the beginning of his poem. “And list the nightingale - she dwells just here. Hush! let the wood-gate softly clap, for fear, The noise might drive her from her home of love ;For here I’ve heard her many a merry year -At morn, at eve, nay, all the live-long day,As though she lived on song.”
    ...
    just here.”
    John Clare is describing his stroll through the forst, in search of a bird that lives within the trees.
    ...
    on song.”
    Here Clare is evidently concerned about spooking the bird, making her flee from her place of nesting. It would be particularly upsetting as Clare always listens to her, as she is seemingly always singer for him, as if she needs to sing to live.
    Lines 8-14 - Just where that old-man’s-beard all wildly trails, Rude arbours o’er the road, and stops the way -And where that child its blue-bell flowers hath got, Laughing and creeping through the mossy rails - There have I hunted like a very boy, Creeping on hands and knees through matted thorn, To find her nest, and see her feed her young.”
    Here John Clare is describing the winding trails, made of the trees limbs and growings as he moves through the mossy grounds, remaining stealthy to get close enough to see her feed her children.
    ...
    thought unborn.”
    These lines make Clare’s time not important. As he loses track of time in his pure enjoyment of searching for the bird.
    Lines 17-25 - And where those crimping fern-leaves ramp among, The hazel’s under boughs, I’ve nestled down, And watched her while she sung ; and her renown Hath made me marvel that so famed a bird, Should have no better dress than russet brown. Her wings would tremble in her ecstasy, And feathers stand on end, as ’twere with joy, And mouth wide open to release her heart, Of its out-sobbing songs.”
    ...
    The Nightingale is a master of hiding herself. Although, John Clare continues to still look, dodging branches and stepping of the boughs, accepting defeat today but, vowing to come back another day. Clare has a hunch he is getting close to finding her, looking in the spots he thinks she will be but, the she is to smart for easy spots, a place where enemies will never think about.
    Lines 58-62 - How subtle is the bird ! she started out, And raised a plaintive note of danger nigh, Ere we were past the brambles ; and now, near, Her nest, she sudden stops - as choking fear, That might betray her home."
    ...
    destroy her.
    How curious is the nest ; no other bird Uses such loose materials, or weaves, Its dwelling in such spots : dead oaken leaves, Are placed without, and velvet moss within,
    "And little scraps of grass, and, scant and spare, What scarcely seem materials, down and hair ; For from men’s haunts she nothing seems to win. Yet Nature is the builder, and contrives, Homes for her children’s comfort, even here ; Where Solitude’s disciples spend their lives Unseen, save when a wanderer passes near, That loves such pleasant places. Deep adown, The nest is made a hermit’s mossy cell."
    (view changes)
    12:39 pm

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